Sonnet composed upon westminster bridge

composed upon westminster bridge context

Wordsworth interprets these feelings he has about the overview from that bridge; he's trying to capture the emotion generated by the things he observes. The poem is a Petrarchan or Italian sonnetarranged into an octave or eight-line section and a sestet or six-line section although unlike some Petrarchan sonnets, Wordsworth does not have a blank line dividing the eighth and ninth linerhyming abbaabba and cdcdcd the abba abba rhyme scheme in the first eight lines is the giveaway that this is a Petrarchan sonnet.

He says that anyone who didn't stop, who just passed by with a glance, would be "dull Line Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: Instead of trying to describe the scene, as we might expect by now hurry up, a sonnet is only 14 lines long!

He liked to use such phrases in some of his poetry, an attempt to reflect the language of the street?

Sonnet composed upon westminster bridge stanza explanation

Analysis of Composed upon Westminster bridge Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, is Wordsworth's delicately wrought dedication to the capital of England, the city of London. Despite being all crowded together within one city, the speaker gives an impression of spaciousness by noting that the ships and buildings are "open" to the fields of London and to the sky. One thing you could not have seen in , but that you could see today, is the Big Ben clock — it wasn't built yet. Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill; Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! The setting is "silent" because of the early hour which, from Dorothy Wordsworth's journal, we know was around 5 or 6am. Wordsworth must have purposely constructed it this way to highlight the unusual nature of his subject. One oddity is line 13 that starts with Dear God!

Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill; Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!

The persona uses hyperbole or exaggeration to speak of the importance of the city. Simile Line 4 contains a simile No doubting though the popularity of this well known sonnet, its scanty plot of ground, and its ability to split opinion down the middle.

It's a fleeting, transient beauty. Anyone could be wearing it, and you'd be like, "That's one heck of a garment, there. Despite being all crowded together within one city, the speaker gives an impression of spaciousness by noting that the ships and buildings are "open" to the fields of London and to the sky.

As to the sonnet's inherent beauty, that is up to the reader, but there are some intricate rhythms involved in these lines, and the pace is controlled with clever syntax.

Which is it?

composed upon westminster bridge essay
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